With the second edition of Gray’s Dissection Guide for Human Anatomy came a number of important changes, the principal stimulus for which was the publication of the first edition of Gray’s Anatomy for Students (GAFS) in 2005, a year after the publication of the first edition of our dissection guide.

The publication of GAFS provided the opportunity to coordinate the second edition of our dissection guide with that textbook. We did so through use of the same nomenclature (Termina Anatomica), through balance of content, and through shared illustrations. Indeed, some of the illustrations from GAFS adorn the pages of our second edition, adding new graphic content and improving the delivery of information. In addition, not only have we cross-referenced our dissection guide to content in GAFS; we have also cross-referenced it to the fourth edition of Netter’s Atlas of Human Anatomy (NAHA) and to the Atlas of Clinical Gross Anatomy (ACGA). Thus, for every dissection step, students are pointed to additional expert knowledge provided by GAFS, NAHA, and ACGA. For ease and convenience, the cross-references are positioned at the upper right of each page. This rich cross-referencing style adds to the original intent of our dissection guide: to focus on instructions that guide efficient dissection

Free Books PDF: Dissection Guide for Gray’s Human Anatomy
Free Books PDF: Dissection Guide for Gray’s Human Anatomy

Another important modification in the second edition is expansion of the original four units into six. This was accomplished by dividing Unit 1 (Back and Thorax) into two units (Unit 1: Back; Unit 2: Thorax) and by dividing Unit 4 (Limbs) into two units (Unit 5: Upper Limb; Unit 6: Lower Limb). In the first edition of our dissection guide, the limb dissections provided a systemic anatomy approach. In this second edition, the approach for the limb dissections is regional, to maintain consistency throughout the guide. These organizational changes are intended to add flexibility to the dissection guide for use in human gross anatomy courses that follow an order of dissection that differs from the order followed at the University of Utah, the organizational template used for the first edition.

A third area of modification in the second edition is the addition of an osteology lab at the beginning of each unit.

A fourth area of modification in the second edition is the revision and correction of content. This important task was facilitated by the invaluable advice of a dozen expert anatomists. These experts also encouraged us to preserve the black-and-white illustrations, using color highlights to improve visual appeal.

The changes to the second edition prompted our editor to suggest the new title, Gray’s Dissection Guide for Human Anatomy, a name that we feel honored to use. Accompanying this revision is a brilliant new cover.

Crafting the second edition of Gray’s Dissection Guide for Human Anatomy has been an exciting endeavor whose successful completion can be attributed in no small part to contributions by numerous anatomists and by the staff at Elsevier. To all of you, we offer a heartfelt thank-you!

Free Books PDF: Dissection Guide for Gray’s Human Anatomy

DOWNLOAD LINK

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here